What the June 2017 Election will mean for North Manchester Property

Today, the Prime Minister announced a snap General Election for 8th June 2017, providing the vote to overturn the Fixed Term Parliament Act goes through tomorrow as expected, once again Britain will go to the polls on 8th June.

Politics isn’t really my bag, I don’t get fired up and passionate about it like I do about Property and the Property Market, but it seems like I am increasingly commentating on the latest political flavour of the month as more often than not they’re having direct impacts on either my landlords, my tenants or both!

In the past year alone I have got on my high horse about: The Rental PledgeRight to RentImmigration ActThe Housing and Planning BillRegulation of Buy to Let Mortgages, Brexit,  Licensing, Buy to Let Mortgages, and Clause 24, also known as Section 24, also known as the Tenant tax, this has been a big one for me see here, here and here

The I also comment on the effects of government policy like: Greater Manchester sees record number of evictions, What does the Budget Mean For Us? and The benefits capital of Britain is revealed: New map shows which parts of the country guzzle the biggest chunks of UK’s £161BILLION welfare bill.

So whilst I offer the caveat that politics isn’t really my thing, I certainly seem to have a lot to say on the matter, and so I should, as it directly impacts on me both as a landlord and as a business owner and I can see it directly impacting upon my tenants too. Today’s announcement will take up a lot of attention in the media and all around the internet for the coming 6 weeks, we will still be issuing our regular blogs, videos and social media updates, but will also be available to talk with anyone who has any questions or concerns about the North Manchester Property Market

I manage property across 10 Labour constituencies in North and East Manchester, given the disarray within all of the opposition parties, I expect conservatives to gain more seats. Its doubtful these will come from my constituencies, but there’s a chance.

From a wider perspective, a stronger conservative majority will mean Brexit could move smoother, if the result goes as expected, less overall drama and more getting meat on the bones of negotiations and deals. This could add some further stability and confidence to the economy and help continue the stable growth of the country. With no huge build programme on the horizon, demand for property will remain strong and prices will continue to grow.

More restrictions will apply to benefits and a tightening of the benefits cap, which will have a particularly telling affect on tenants in North Manchester.

What are your thoughts? have your say in the comments below

How To Let Your House Faster

This week our lettings manager, Joe, discusses a real life example of a landlord increasing the rent on a property by 35% and managing to let this property within just one day. He talks about the benefits of properly maintaining a property, and how cosmetic improvements can have a huge difference on your return on investment as a landlord.

The North Manchester Rental Property Market continues to boom and demand is at a never before seen level, as an independent agent, Joe is helping landlords across the city realise the potential of their investments and achieve maximum returns. You can see more videos like this on our youtube channel: www.youtube.com/channel/UC1De9fjnKz1NtdI45iZE9XA/videos

To talk further with Joe about Investing in property in North Manchester, call him on 0161 681 3724 or drop him an email joe@brentwood-lettings.co.uk

 

 

Blackley School Praised by Ofsted

Following two previous inspections deeming the school as inadequate, the leadership teams at Our Lady’s High School in Higher Blackey have completely transformed the failing to school to become a school that is rated “Good” in all areas. The latest Ofsted report has praised the efforts of the staff to turn the school around.

Headteacher Lee Ormsby took over at the helm of the school in 2015 and has been working relentlessly with senioe leadership, staff, parents and pupils with a mission to develop all students to their full potential.

Many of our tenants have children who attend this school, and like us they are proud of the huge feat achieved by the team at Our Lady’s RC High. With Blackley becoming an ever more popular choice with renters, especially those with young families, this result by Ofsted has cemented Blackley as an up and coming area for property investment and this school one to watch for the future.

Well done to Our Lady’s RC High

 

DSS or Dogs?

Yesterday a very intersting article was published on the BBC website: No DSS: Most flat shares refuse benefit claimants

It claims that landlords are twice as likely to accept potential tenants who own pets than people who claim benefits.

The article goes on to look at the case of one particular tenant, Eva, who is a single parent, working full time but having her low wage subsidised by Housing Benefit. Day in day out we come across numerous people like Eva, hard working, honest people who have become victims of a stereotype and face discrimination due to their circumstances. We do not recommend or condone lying about your circumstances to obtain a rental property, often with our tenants it is the case that we can sit down and work together to agree affordability and help find a suitable property, as we understand the local market and our landlords tend to be receptive to tenants in receipt of benefits.

The private rented sector has doubled in size since 2002 and now accounts for 20% of all UK households, recent cuts in welfare means benefit payments in many parts of Manchester no longer cover the rest.

You can see our thoughts below on this short video regarding renting to people on housing benefit

 

Every week our Lettings Manager, Joe, makes a short video in response to enquiries throughout the week, if you’re interested in viewing more of our videos you can do so on our YouTube Channel

£13.8bn – The Value of The North Manchester Property Market

“How Much Would it Cost To Buy All The Houses and Flats in North Manchester?”

This fascinating question was posed by the 11-year-old son of one of my landlords when they both popped into my offices. At the time I didn’t have an answer for him, instead throwing my hands in the air I smiled and vaguely answered “hundreds of millions”. I hadn’t ever thought about the total value of the market, so I thought to myself that it would be interesting to sit down and calculate what the total value of all the properties in North Manchester are worth.

Now this isn’t something that you can just google lightly and ping receive an answer, you can readily find information on house prices and trends, you can find population data on a city wide basis and lots of vague demographics dotted around, but nothing readily prepackaged to tell you 1) how many houses are in an area and 2) what the values of those houses are. It took me considerably more work than I first anticipated and became a bit of a mission for me to solve this problem.

I started with the city council, then went to the office for national statistics, then pulled census data and land registry files. I quickly found myself with reams upon reams of data which all gave lots of clues, but no definitive answer.

When I delved into the numbers, the first thing I found was that the average price currently being paid for a North Manchester property stands at £99,229.  Which seemed a little low, so I split the property market down into individual property types in North Manchester; the average numbers come out like this.

 

Curious as to how the figure settled at £99,229 I then looked at the distribution of the types of homes in North Manchester, and found this:

 

Working out of Moston, and area heavily packed with street upon street of terraced houses, I wasn’t too surprised to see terraced houses dominating the statistics for North Manchester. However, what was initially surprising was the figure for the number of flats.

I initially wrote this figure off as being inflated by bedsits, converted homes, flats above shops and some of the larger mixed use commercial buildings. However, I chose to dig a little deeper into the distribution of the types of flats in North Manchester and this is what I found:

 

Although, from working in the North Manchester property market for the best part of my life, I did appreciate there were a fair number of flats, I hadn’t until now got my head around the fact that there were just shy of 28,000 flat in the area, of which over 24,500 were within custom built blocks or tenements.

 

A cool £2.1bn could bag you ALL of the flats in North Manchester. Sitting at the lowest price point the local flats are offering astounding returns on investment as rental properties and are in very high demand with the young professional market.

If you happen to be a multi billionaire, check down the back of your sofa, in that pair of jeans that you don’t wear but are hanging onto incase they fit again or in an old coat pocket- if you happen to find a spare £2.1bn give us a call and we’ll talk about investments.

If you’re not a multi billionaire, and like me you’re just a regular person trying to save for the future and provide security for your family this information may seem pie in the sky, but I promise there is a point to it all.

What does this all mean for North Manchester Investors?  

Well as we enter the unchartered waters of 2017 and beyond, even though property values are already declining in certain parts of the London property market, the outlook in North Manchester remains relatively good as over the last five years, the local property market was a lot more sensible than central London’s.

North Manchester house values will remain resilient for several reasons.  Firstly, demand for rental property remains strong with continued immigration and population growth.  Secondly, with 0.25 per cent interest rates, borrowing has never been so cheap and finally the simple lack of new house building in North Manchester not keeping up with current demand, let alone eating into years and years of under investment – means only one thing – yes it might be a bit of a bumpy ride over the next 12 to 24 months but, in the medium term, property ownership and property investment in North Manchester has always, and will always, ride out the storm.

 

Advice for Blackley Landlords

Previously an important player in the chemicals industry, the North Manchester district of Blackley is a popular choice for renters looking for affordable properties to call home. The area is within easy reach of the cosmopolitan city of Manchester, as well as enjoying excellent road and public transport links with the rest of the North West. Blackley offers relatively cheap investment opportunities to would-be landlords, and houses and flats cost less than in many of the city’s suburbs. With a number of attractive green spaces such as Boggart Hole Clough, Blackley Forest and the famous Heaton Park, Blackley is popular with families who want easy access to outdoor areas.

Although originally a rural village, Blackley is now a built-up area and saw huge growth in population throughout much of the 20th century. If you’re looking to invest in a rental property in Blackley, expect to pay from around £70,000 for a small terraced house or new build flat. If you are thinking of letting property in Blackley and are not familiar with the area, there are a number of reputable estate and property agencies that can provide Blackley landlord advice.

If you’re new to owning rental properties, here are some tips to help you ensure you don’t fall foul of regulations put in place to protect tenants

Using an Assured Shorthold Tenancy

An Assured Shorthold Tenancy (or AST) is the most common type of tenancy agreement. It was originally brought in in order to provide protection for both parties involved in the rental agreement – the tenant and the landlord. The Assured Shorthold Tenancy should be in writing and both parties should take steps to ensure they fully understand the terms and conditions of the agreement. Relying on oral or informal agreements can lead to serious problems and misunderstandings further down the line, so always ensure everything is placed in writing.

The Assured Shorthold Tenancy includes a number of points, but some of the most important ones are as follows:

– The landlord is entitled to request a market rent
– The landlord is permitted to take back the property after a period of six months
– If the tenant does not pay the required rent, the landlord can take their property back before six months has passed. In this case, the tenant must owe a minimum of eight weeks’ rent.
– The deposit paid by the tenant must, by law, be placed in an official and approved tenancy deposit scheme. This protects all tenant deposits paid on or after 6th April 2007.

The Deposit Protection Scheme

Introduced to protect the deposits paid by tenants to landlords or their agents, this scheme was introduced in April 2007 in England. All deposits paid by tenants in England must be put into an approved secure deposit scheme. This can help resolve any issues that arise at the end of the tenancy agreement when the tenant is moving out of your property. If you are a landlord and you receive a deposit from your tenant, you must place the funds in a suitable scheme no later than 30 days after your tenant gives you the deposit. It is also your responsibility to update your tenant on the scheme you have used and let them know their rights.

The Importance of the Inventory

Many landlords, even experienced ones, often cut corners when compiling an inventory. While it’s easy to become complacent, the inventory is extremely important and is a vital tool that protects both you and your tenant. Make a thorough and detailed list of every item in your property, including all furniture and any fixtures, fittings and accessories you will be leaving in the property while it’s being rented. Include every item in the property, along with descriptions wherever necessary. Include the approximate (or exact if known) age of every item, and its condition, as well as any comments you feel are relevant. You should encourage your tenant to carefully read the inventory before you both sign it.

Anti-discrimination Laws

Finally, when you are planning to let a property in Blackley or anywhere else in the country, you should be aware that it is illegal to refuse any tenant on the grounds of their gender, disability, religion, race or sexuality. There are strict anti-discrimination laws in place to ensure everyone has the right to be treated fairly, so you must bear in mind you will not be able to refuse to let your property to certain groups.

Should You Let to DSS Tenants?

Some landlords won’t let to DSS tenants under any circumstances, but others recognise that not all DSS tenants are going to wreck the house and turn it into a crack pad. In fact, some DSS tenants have more regular, stable incomes than employed people and may be a better bet for a buy-to-let landlord. So how do you sort the wheat from the chaff?

Delays in Payments

One of the key factors with DSS tenants is that they are dependent on the efficiency of the benefits systems which pays them. Universal credit has acted as a gigantic spanner in the works here. Because it involves a switch from the previous benefits system to a new set of processes, it was always going to be difficult, but add in the necessity to alter computer systems, which has never been a strength of government, and you have a recipe for tenants who are not getting the money they need to pay their rent.

This is not their fault, and if they were employees who had not been paid because the banking system had gone down, there would be abject apologies on their behalf. However government appears to think that not paying claimants is a risk-free activity, and government has also decided that DSS tenants who live in private rented accommodation are now personally responsible for paying housing benefit to their landlord.

Clearly, if there are delays in processing a person’s claim, they will not get their housing benefit on time and will be in a position where they must pay the landlord late. DSS tenants are people who are in receipt of housing benefit. How much they get depends on their circumstances and any other income that they have.

But tenants are usually very clear with landlords about the amount of benefits they receive, because if they manage to secure a tenancy, they need to inform the Housing Officer of the new rent that they have agreed to.

Poor Publicity has Affected the Better Tenants

Many tenants who are claiming benefits and want to pay landlords rent from their housing benefit are in their current situation through no fault of their own. They may have been diagnosed with a serious illness that has meant they could not continue in work. Or they may have lost their jobs, been unable to keep up their mortgage payments, had to sell their house, spent the resulting equity in private accommodation and finally ended up claiming housing benefit. Anyone dealing with lettings and Manchester property in general will have come across these cases.

Unfortunately, some reality TV programmes have given the impression that anybody claiming any kind of benefit is a drug-addled waster who will trash the property and leave without paying six months’ rent. This simply isn’t the case, any more than employed people who appear to have a lot of income are really faking it and waiting to sublet the property to another dozen tenants.

In the employed sector and the DSS sector, there are good and bad people who may make excellent or dreadful tenants. The key thing is to be able to distinguish between the two.

How to Get a Good DSS Tenant

One of the things you need to look for is any disparity between the amount that the tenant is receiving in housing benefit, and the amount that you are charging. The tenant has to make up the shortfall every month and if they are disabled or have no access to extra income, they are going to find this extremely difficult. So, to avoid rent arrears, make sure that your tenants can afford the rent from their housing benefit.

Make sure that you have a suitable landlord’s insurance policy in place and don’t gloss over the fact that you are letting to DSS tenants. Yes, they are slightly higher risk and you may need to pay a slightly higher premium but let’s face it, these tenants tend to be renting in areas where property is cheaper, and therefore rental yields are higher. Just accept slightly higher insurance as the cost of doing business.

And always meet the tenants personally. Your gut feeling is probably a better guide than any risk assessment. Look at why the tenants are dependent on DSS payments and you’ll get some insight into whether they are seeking a secure home or are irresponsible and likely to cause you problems.

North Manchester Lettings: Advice for First-time Landlords

The decision to enter the property market as a landlord is not one to be taken lightly, but if you’ve been thinking about it for a while, there’s no time like the present to set the ball rolling on your new venture. Manchester is a great spot for property investors – one of the UK’s major cities, it is well connected to the rest of the country by road, rail and air, and has a large student population. Both these factors mean there is always a steady stream of renters looking for the perfect property. If you choose wisely and research your target rental market, you should have no trouble generating interest in you property (or properties).

This article aims to provide practical North Manchester landlord advice for those who are new to the area, or new to the property market.

Decide What Type of Tenant You Want

You might not have any firm ideas of what type of tenant you would like to rent out your property to, but it’s very helpful to know who your market is. North Manchester is popular with a wide variety of renters – including students, young professionals, families and older couples – but not all groups will want to rent the same types of property. Students have become increasingly demanding in the last couple of decades, and the traditional cramped, damp, run-down red brick terraced student properties of the past will no longer cut it. Many students prefer to live in designated student apartments with all mod cons, excellent facilities and good transport links. It’s still possible to rent private properties to groups of students, but students tend to congregate in certain areas, particularly to the south of Manchester, so are unlikely to want to live in a district that is predominantly home to families.

If you want to target families, you will need to think about the proximity of schools. North Manchester has a large number of primary and secondary schools, some more popular with parents than others. Proximity to a good school can have an impact on house prices, but you might also be able to command a higher rental fee if you are in a catchment area of a top school, so you should bear this in mind if your target renters have children.

Young professionals are likely to want a property that’s close to nightlife and shops, or at least has excellent transport links to the nearest decent nightlife. In the case of North Manchester, this is likely to mean excellent links to the city centre – so look for good train, bus or tram links, or at least somewhere that is a short and affordable taxi ride away. North Manchester’s Metrolink tram system is very popular with commuters, so properties near a tramline are always a good bet.

Don’t Over-estimate the Market

As an investor, you have the advantage that you are not part of a chain and you do not need to wait for your own property to sell before you complete. This can be a big attraction to vendors, and may allow you to drive down the price on your chosen property. Emphasise your ability to commit and proceed with the sale immediately when you make an offer, but don’t get carried away and be tempted to pay more than you can realistically afford, or more than makes sense given your likely return on investment. While North Manchester has some highly desirable areas, many districts – such as Harpurhey and Moston – are known for their affordable housing and tend to have something of a rough reputation. No matter how desirable or modern any property you purchase in areas like these, you will struggle to attract renters prepared to pay premium level rents.

Seek Professional Advice

If you have never let out a property before, you will need to ensure you fulfill all your legal obligations. There have been moves to clamp down on unscrupulous and negligent landlords in recent years, and tenants have a number of rights you will need to be aware of. If you are not entirely sure of all your responsibilities as a landlord, seek advice from a professional who can ensure you don’t fall foul of the law. There are numerous agencies with specialist knowledge of the North Manchester rental market and these can help you target the right renters for your property, and help ensure a mutually beneficial relationship for both you and your tenants.

How the EU Referendum is Affecting Manchester Property Prices

The UK’s referendum on whether the country should remain a part of the European Union or leave, which took place at the end of June, has had far-reaching effects in many sectors, and recent figures reveal it’s impacting on property prices throughout the country. Fifty-two percent of those who voted chose to vote Leave, dividing the country, as well as towns, families and neighbourhoods. The long-term effects are still not known, but it appears areas where people voted to leave the EU have been hit hardest in terms of the property market. In fact, of the 47 cities and towns that experienced falling house prices just after the referendum, around 85% voted Leave.

In the year leading up to the referendum, England property prices rose by just over 9% on average. However, figures from July – the first full month after the referendum – revealed that the month-on-month rise had fallen to a far lower 0.4%. The referendum appears to have affected different parts of the country to varying degrees, with many analysts noting that areas that voted to leave the European Union have tended to suffer the most dramatic falls in property prices. While Manchester voted to remain in the EU, some parts of the region voted to leave. These Brexit supporting towns and districts have been the hardest hit by the slow down in house price rises.

Government data reveals that property prices in 47 cities and towns actually dropped immediately after the referendum, and a staggering 40 of these places were among those that voted to exit the EU. One such example is Rochdale, part of Greater Manchester. Rochdale residents voted in favour of leaving the Union, and the town saw a drop in average house prices of over £1,200 in the month after the vote. Similarly, Bury, where just over half of local residents voted in favour of leaving the EU, the average house fell in price by over £1,100.

The government figures also revealed that 278 towns and cities covered by their research saw house prices rise or stay at the same level as before the vote. Of these 278, just 74% had voted to leave the EU. As well as Manchester itself, places such as Stockport and Trafford also voted Remain. All three experienced house price increases in July – £2,222 in Manchester, an impressive £4,000 in Stockport, and £1,344 in Trafford.

The Brexit supporting districts and towns surrounding Manchester may have experienced some falls in property prices in the aftermath of the referendum, but data reveals that it was the north-east of the country that was hit hardest by falling prices. For example, Ribble Valley returned a vote for Leave in the referendum and saw prices drop by nearly £8,000.

Analysts and property industry experts generally believe it is too early to assess what the long-term impact of the referendum result will be, but many are in agreement that those areas that have been hardest hit have so far tended to be those that voted to leave the European Union. Many property experts believe it is likely that house prices will fall in 2017, eventually possibly recovering in the following year.

If you are currently looking to enter the rental property market as a landlord, it’s important to choose your location carefully. This is often fairly straightforward if you live in or near the area you’re planning to buy in, but it can be very difficult if you’re looking further afield for a rental property. The area you choose to buy in will of course depend on your budget and on your target rental market, and while the impact of the referendum result is yet to be fully understood, it’s worth bearing in mind that there might be a fall in EU migrants in the coming months and years. If you were planning to buy in an area with a high proportion of EU workers – for example, near a large hospital where many of the staff are migrant workers – it’s worth bearing in mind that competition among landlords may heat up in the near future. The most sensible course of action is to follow property news – both national and local – and ensure you’re fully informed before you take the plunge.

Becoming a landlord can be an extremely lucrative decision, and property remains one of the best and safest ways to invest. Keeping abreast of Moston property news, and all the local property market developments, will enable you to make the best decisions and enjoy the maximum returns on your investment.

“Right to Rent”: New Rules

Landlords and letting agents need to make sure they’re on top of the new set of amendments to the Immigration Act which came into effect at the beginning of December.

The penalty for letting to illegal migrants has been toughened. Previously this was a civil offence, but it’s now become a criminal offence, which means the fines are potentially higher and there is even a possibility, in the worst cases, of a prison sentence.

The vast majority of letting agents and landlords will be unaffected by these particular changes, but there are a few other amendments in the area of evictions that they ought to be aware of.

Who Has the Right to Rent?

These new regulations revolve around the right to rent and the Home Office identifying people who are in the country illegally and therefore do not have the right to rent property. If the Secretary of State has given them permission to take up the tenancy, that’s okay, otherwise the Home Office refers to these people as “disqualified” from renting and they are basically those who:

• Need permission to enter or stay in the UK but don’t have it
• Do have leave to stay but are subject to a condition saying that they can’t occupy the dwelling they are currently occupying

Agents and landlords already have to check tenants’ documentation to make sure they are here legally. Remember to check all of the tenants – you’re not allowed to pick out individuals you have suspicions about. You need to make copies of the documents and to keep them for a year after the tenancy ends.

There’s been some grumbling from landlords about the fact that they are not experts at document authentication. How are they supposed to know whether a passport is genuine or not, unless it’s a really obvious fake? There’s no answer to that, so it’s a case of doing the best you can.

1. If none of your tenants has a legal right to rent

If none of the adult tenants has the right to rent and the Secretary of State notifies the landlord of their identity, the landlord can give the tenants 28 days notice provided that the notice is correctly worded and formatted. This notice can only be used where the Home Office has given the landlord notification that all of the occupiers are disqualified from renting and not in any other circumstances.

You can use this notice even if the tenancy started before the changes to the legislation came in. If it is properly served with the accompanying Home Office list of tenants, then the landlord can repossess the property without any recourse to the High Court – the notice itself is like a High Court order. See here for more information: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2016/1060/images/uksi_20161060_en_001.

You can serve the notice by delivering it in person to the tenants, sending it through the post, leaving it at the property and so on. The Protection from Eviction Act won’t apply to tenants who are identified as having no right to rent.

2. Some have the right, some don’t

A much more common situation will be that a group of tenants are renting a house, and while some of them have the right to rent, others don’t. Again, the landlord has to have a written notice identifying the disqualified tenant, and this must come from the Secretary of State (i.e. the Home Office).

It now begins to get a lot more complicated, and any landlord in North Manchester would do well at this stage to talk to their letting agent who will be able to give professional advice or point them in the right direction.

Also be aware that the landlord has to take action within a reasonable period. Currently we are waiting for guidance on what that actually means, but a period of four weeks has been mentioned.

Landlords Have Trouble Keeping up with the Changes

The fact that these changes have happened and yet most members of the general public are unaware of them shows just how difficult it is, particularly for smaller landlords, to keep up with the constant amendments to legislation. One law is changed, and because of the complexity of the legal framework that governs housing, another law is amended in consequence.

It’s not surprising that landlords need to use letting agents. An individual landlord would be really hard pushed to keep up with these constant changes.

Cobden Street Blackley Main image

Cobden Street

** NEWLY REFURBISHED** Brentwood Lettings are pleased to offer this well located, newly decorated property to rent…

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Silton Street

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Ruth Avenue

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Burns Road

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Ventnor Street

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Butman Street

M18

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St Georges Drive

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Honister Road

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