Clause 24 Calculator

In the Summer Budget on 08 July 2015 the Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne announced the proposal to remove full mortgage interest relief on qualifying BTL interest and finance costs (which includes costs such as lender application fees) and instead to limit the relief to the basic rate of tax only. This would mean that, when calculating your annual profits for tax purposes you would NOT deduct loan interest and other finance costs to arrive at your nett trading profit. Obviously, the result of this would be to distort the true income derived from letting property and to dramatically increase landlords’ tax bills.

The Chancellor stated that this measure would affect only higher rate taxpayers, but you will see that it would, in effect, turn the majority of BTL landlords into higher rate taxpayers. In calculating your adjusted annual income, all BTL rent (after other qualifying deductions) would count as income, as would any income from employment, dividends, etc. You would then only receive relief at the basic rate (currently 20%) on your loan interest. The way this was announced by the Chancellor made it appear that the relief from 2020/21 onwards would only reduce from 40% or 45% to 20%, but it actually reduces from 100% to 20%.

The actual effect of these measures would be to reduce the nett, take home income for a significant proportion of landlords, whether they are full time professional landlords, or part time landlords, like school teachers, nurses, fire fighters, etc.

The illustrations here calculate the effect of these proposals when they are fully implemented in 2020/21, although during the preceding three years there is a ‘tapered’ introduction of the measures. The illustrations use the current personal allowance, tax rates and tax bands for 2015/16, although you can change them. The illustrations are based purely upon my own interpretation of the proposed new tax rules provided by HMRC, which can be seen in more detail here >>

The HMRC guide above, under the title “Impact on individuals, households and families” states, “It is expected that 1 in 5 individual landlords will receive less relief as a result of this measure.” However, the HMRC have neglected to understand that the top 20% of private landlords own as much as 80% of the housing stock in the private rented sector. Therefore, the impact of these changes in terms of rent increases to offset the tax hike could be widespread.

At this stage these proposals are not yet law, not until they are approved in the Summer Finance Bill 2015 and there is sure to be considerable debate with interested parties before that happens. Even then, the measures will not come into force until April 2017, so there may still be time to influence the Chancellor.

I urge you to use this calculator to demonstrate the effects of the full implementation of these proposals (which for the majority of landlords will be drastic) and to visit your MP to make him/her aware of the crippling effect on your personal finances and to insist that he/she makes the Chancellor aware of these effects publicly in the House of Commons, where it will be officially recorded and come to the attention of the public.

 

Example 1.

Victor runs a carpet fitting business, which is successful, but the workload can be up and down. He also owns 5 buy to let properties, but he wants to grow his portfolio to provide an alternative and stable means of income to supplement the lean times in his carpet business and to provide an income for his retirement.

Tax
Rate
Tax
Band
Current
Rules
2020 Budget
Proposals
£ Tax   Tax
Salary 40,000 40,000
Nett rental income before loan interest & finance costs 50,000 50,000
Interest & finance costs 38,500 38,500
Taxable income / profit 51,500 90,000
Personal allowance 0% 10,600 10,600 0 10,600 0
Basic rate tax 20% 31,785 31,785 6,357 31,785 6,357
Higher rate tax 40% 118,215 9,115 3,646 47,615 19,046
Additional rate tax 45% 10,000,000 0 0 0 0
Loss of personal allowance 40% 10,600 0 0 0 0
Tax relief on interest 20% 38,500 -7,700
Total tax 10,003 17,703
Total nett income (take home)     41,497 33,797
Effective tax rate over personal allowance 24% 43%
Percentage change to effective tax rate 177% Greater than 100% is an increase in effective tax rate.
Less than 100% is a decrease in effective tax rate.
100% means no change to effective tax rate.

 

 

Example 2

John is retired and owns a portfolio of 14 buy to let properties jointly with his wife that they grew over 25 working years as a pension, so they have no other source of income in their retirement. John’s share of the rental income is £70,000 per year and his share of the interest and finance costs is £54,000 per year.

Tax
Rate
Tax
Band
Current
Rules
2020 Budget
Proposals
      £ Tax   Tax
Salary 0 0
Nett rental income before loan interest & finance costs 70,000 70,000
Interest & finance costs 54,000 54,000
Taxable income / profit 16,000 70,000
Personal allowance 0% 10,600 10,600 0 10,600 0
Basic rate tax 20% 31,785 5,400 1,080 31,785 6,357
Higher rate tax 40% 118,215 0 0 27,615 11,046
Additional rate tax 45% 10,000,000 0 0 0 0
Loss of personal allowance 40% 10,600 0 0 0 0
Tax relief on interest 20% 54,000 -10,800
Total tax 1,080 6,603
Total nett income (take home)     14,920 9,397
Effective tax rate over personal allowance 20% 122%
Percentage change to effective tax rate 611% Greater than 100% is an increase in effective tax rate.
Less than 100% is a decrease in effective tax rate.
100% means no change to effective tax rate.

 

Example 3

Mary is a primary school teacher. She inherited the family home after her parents passed away and refinanced it to raise the money for deposits on 4 small buy to let properties. Her salary is £25,000, she receives £24,000 of rental income per year and her interest and finance costs are £15,000 per year.

Tax
Rate
Tax
Band
Current
Rules
2020 Budget
Proposals
      £ Tax   Tax
Salary 25,000 25,000
Nett rental income before loan interest & finance costs 24,000 24,000
Interest & finance costs 15,000 15,000
Taxable income / profit 34,000 49,000
Personal allowance 0% 10,600 10,600 0 10,600 0
Basic rate tax 20% 31,785 23,400 4,680 31,785 6,357
Higher rate tax 40% 118,215 0 0 6,615 2,646
Additional rate tax 45% 10,000,000 0 0 0 0
Loss of personal allowance 40% 10,600 0 0 0 0
Tax relief on interest 20% 15,000 -3,000
Total tax 4,680 6,003
Total nett income (take home)     29,320 27,997
Effective tax rate over personal allowance 20% 26%
Percentage change to effective tax rate 128% Greater than 100% is an increase in effective tax rate.
Less than 100% is a decrease in effective tax rate.
100% means no change to effective tax rate.

 

Example 4

Janet is a professional landlord and has been for the last 25 years. Her family owns and manages a large portfolio of properties that provides an income for Janet, her husband, her two grown up children and their families They house 32 families and 9 single adults and they employ a small team of maintenance staff.

Tax
Rate
Tax
Band
Current
Rules
2020 Budget
Proposals
      £ Tax   Tax
Salary 0 0
Nett rental income before loan interest & finance costs 125,000 125,000
Interest & finance costs 50,000 50,000
Taxable income / profit 75,000 125,000
Personal allowance 0% 10,600 10,600 0 10,600 0
Basic rate tax 20% 31,785 31,785 6,357 31,785 6,357
Higher rate tax 40% 118,215 32,615 13,046 82,615 33,046
Additional rate tax 45% 10,000,000 0 0 0 0
Loss of personal allowance 40% 10,600 0 0 10,600 4,240
Tax relief on interest 20% 50,000 -10,000
Total tax 19,403 33,643
Total nett income (take home)     55,597 41,357
Effective tax rate over personal allowance 30% 52%
Percentage change to effective tax rate 173% Greater than 100% is an increase in effective tax rate.
Less than 100% is a decrease in effective tax rate.
100% means no change to effective tax rate.

 

Example 5

 

You! Use this calculator and tell us in the comments what affect the 2020 proposals will have on your take home income.

 

Access the Sheet here

 



			

Landlords and the Housing and Planning Bill

The Housing and Planning Bill is set to become a cornerstone of the Conservative Government’s vision for the property and rental market from now until 2020.

This is a heavy weight piece of legislation, much of the content trailed in advance in the Conservative Manifesto and “Fixing the Foundations”, the new Government’s productivity plan – it has 145 clauses and 11 schedules.

The measures are far reaching and are intended to ease the way and encourage the building of new starter homes and self-build among many other things to do with planning and development. Local authorities, many of whom have so far resisted planning and development measures introduced under the last government, for example the conversation of redundant office space to residential, will be put under a duty to promote the supply of new homes, and to prepare reports about the actions they have taken under the starter homes duties.

However, of most interest to landlords are the measures included to tackle so called “rogue landlords”.

Banning Orders

BANNING ORDER red Rubber Stamp over a white background.

A banning order is a new concept in housing which will be an order made by the First-tier (Property) Tribunal, which has the effect of banning a person from:

  • letting housing in England;
  • engaging in letting agency work that relates to housing in England;
  • engaging in property management work that relates to housing in England;
  • or doing two or more of those things.

The regulations will be set out what explaining constitutes a banning order offence. A local housing authority in England will be able to apply for a banning order against a person who has been convicted of a banning order offence.

Before applying for a banning order, the authority will need to give that person a notice of intended proceedings, informing them that the authority is applying for a banning order, and inviting them to appeal within 28 days.

The clause in the Bill provides that in deciding whether to make a banning order and if so, what order to make, the Tribunal must consider:

  • the seriousness of the offence;
  • any previous convictions that the person has for a banning order offence;
  • whether the person is or ever was included in the database of rogue landlords and letting agents;
  • the likely effect of the banning order on the person against whom the banning order is proposed to be made and anyone else who may be affected by such an order.

A ban must last for at least six months. If the order is breached, a the local authority can impose a financial penalty up to £5,000.

A breach of a banning order does not invalidate or affect the enforceability of any provision of a tenancy or other contract. In particular, this is to ensure that a tenancy agreement cannot be found to be invalid on the basis that it was granted when a landlord or letting agent was subject to a banning order.

This provides protection for the parties to a tenancy agreement by ensuring that they do not lose their rights under the agreement as a result of the banning order.

Creating a Database of Rogue Landlords… and Letting Agents

Housing-enforcement-offic-012The Secretary of State is to be required to establish and operate a database of rogue landlords and letting agents. All local housing authorities in England will be responsible for maintaining the content of the database.

Those with banning orders made against them will be included, plus those where a local authority deems them suitable for inclusion, even if they are not in possession of a banning order. An appeal mechanism is to be available for those included in the “rogues’ database”.

Rent Repayment Orders

dab1422639385_866_90984443This provision in the Bill for Rent Repayment Orders will empower the First-tier Tribunal to make the orders to deter rogue landlords who have committed an offence, or rented housing in breach of the new banning order.

The offences will be:

  • breaches of improvement orders and prohibition notices and of licensing requirements under the Housing Act 2004,
  • violent entry under the Criminal Law Act 1977,
  • and unlawful eviction under the Protection from Eviction Act 1977.

 

An order requires a landlord to repay rent paid by a tenant or to repay to a local housing authority housing benefit or universal credit which had been paid in respect of rent. For clarity, the Bill provides for definitions of a “letting agent”, “letting agency work” and “property management work”. It also describes what is meant by “English letting agency work” and “English property management work”.

Recovering Abandoned Premises in England 

camelot-UK_2012SquattedRoom-78 Abandonment of rental properties has for a long time been a very difficult situation to deal with for landlords, given the provisions of the Protection from Eviction Act 1977. The Bill provides that a landlord may follow course to recover possession of a property where it has been abandoned, without the need for a court order.

A private landlord will be required to give a tenant notice which brings the tenancy to an end on that day, if the tenancy relates to premises in England and certain conditions are met:

  • a certain amount of rent is unpaid (two months, if monthly, or one quarter);
  • that the landlord has given a series of warning notices;
  • and that neither the tenant or a named occupier has responded in writing to those warning notices before the date specified in the notices.

    If you require any further information on any of the details of this article, feel free to call our offices on 0161 681 3724 and we will be glad to help you.

Lettings Agency Fee’s

Since 27th May 2015 it has been a legal requirement that all letting agents must publish full details of their fees and charges. Ours can be found here for Landlords and here for tenants. Letting agents must publish full details of their fees and charges on their websites and prominently display them in all their offices where they deal face to face with customers.

However, some letting agents’ websites do not make it easy for you to see the fees they are charging. Aside from the usual, expected, costs, there may also be other hidden charges that landlords and tenants may not be aware of. The description of what each fee covers and how it is calculated must be clear so you can understand the service and costs covered.

If a letting agent doesn’t show its fees or make them clear you can contact the local council who are responsible for enforcement with fines on the agent of up to £5,000.

Amy Andrew from This is Money spoke to experts at Shelter and easyProperty to find out more about fees so landlords and tenants have the information they need to avoid being overcharged letting agent’s fees. The full article on the Daily Mail website can be read here

We carried out some local research and were surprised by what we found. We typed into google “moston letting agent” and took a look at the first 20 agents website that appeared – we ignored zoopla, on the market, rightmove etc etc and just looked at the websites for our 19 most local competitors (we were the extra one)

Of the 20 agents operating in this area a staggering 13 of them, that’s 65%, have NOT published any of their fee’s on their website, despite it being a legal requirement and them being liable for a £5000 fine.

fees1

If an agent is not publishing their fee’s, as they have been told to do, are they being lazy, ignorant or are they wilfully ignoring the law?

Whichever the three scenario’s, would you be happy leaving your property in the hands of an agent who is guilty of any of the above sins? I wouldnt!

In terms of fee’s, we could obviously only take a small sample of data, as so many agents have chosen not to publish their fees. But of the 7 local agents we found, we first looked at their Let Only Fee’s.

To make the comparisons fair we added up all the additional costs lurking around so each agent was offering for a 2 bed property at £550pcm:

  • Marketing & Advertising
  • Tenant Find
  • Tenant Referencing
  • Deposit Collections and Protection
  • Drawing Up Tenancy Agreement
  • Move in Inventory

Our fee for this basic service is £300 inc VAT below are all the fee’s we found:

fees2

As you can see fee’s range from £300 upto £660 for this single service. We didn’t inflate figures or stretch ourselves down to London to try and shock, all these agents are operating within a couple of miles of our office and these are the fee’s they are charging you just for a simple Let Only Service.

Completing the same exercise for a managed property was a little more complex, but don’t worry, we did it for you.

Sadly when looking further into FULL fee’s we lost another four of our agents, pushing our total of non compliance to the law to a whopping 85% of local agents have no published full fee’s for their landlords.

How did we lose 4 more agents to make this 85%? They were not publishing FULL fee’s, its all good saying what your setup and your commission fee are, but why aren’t the agents publishing their routine maintenance costs, gas safety, epc, electrical inspections etc? How can a landlord compare like with like, when there is so much secrecy?

Again, ask yourself why aren’t these agents publishing their fees? Is it ignorance of their legal obligations? Is it that they don’t want you to know their fees? Or is it simply that they cannot be bothered to update their website? Whatever the reason, do you want to work with these agents who are either lazy, ignorant or downright unlawful?

Our four remaining agents now went head to head with each other looking at total expected fee’s over the course of 12 months on a 2 bed property fetching £550pcm and having all its annual checks. here are our overall results:

fees4

There isnt a great difference between the 3 agents in terms of costing over the year, the difference in rates is about 9% – but thats only from the 3 agents out of 20 who actually published full rates, in accordance with the law. If we get the time to snoop around further it would be really interesting to find out what the real variety in fees is around Moston and East Manchester.

fees5

We obviously cannot publish the names of the agents who are not complying to legal requirements and any updates we receive we will endeavour to use to keep this information accurate.

What are your thoughts on this?

Are Your Agents Fee’s Misleading?

As of 27 May 2015, it became a legal requirement under the Consumer Rights Act for all agents to show their fees as VAT inclusive. This measure, I believe has been introduced to once again clamp down on those rogue agents out there who are hiding their fee’s and misleading their landlords.

I get a real bee in my bonnet about lettings agents fee’s. You may have read my previous posts on hidden fee’s, price hiking and unfair fee’s. I’m now on my hobby horse about misleading fee’s.

I think my anger around fee’s stems from a basic human quality of honesty and trust. The way I work and the way I run my business is in a very open, upfront and honest way. I can do this because i’m a small independant. I manage less than 1000 properties and the book stops at me. I don’t have shareholders to please and pay, I don’t have a board to answer to and I do what I do because I’m a landlord, a business owner and an employer. I’m not a tycoon, I’m not a millionaire and I don’t wear a suit.

I have been running Brentwood Lettings for almost 20 years, and I pride myself on the quality ad the value of service my agency offers to our landlords. We don’t, and have never, advertise prices exclusive of VAT, we don’t add commissions to our contractors rates, we don’t double dip fee’s from both the tenant and the landlord and we don’t overstate our costs.

It would be bad practise for me to point fingers directly at my local competition, but I know all of the above are happening on my doorstep, to landlords within my catchment area and they are happening week in week out and have been happening for years.

If I could get all the landlords in Manchester together in one room and have the opportunity to say one thing to them, just one thing, I wouldn’t self promote, I wouldn’t sell, I wouldn’t even tell them who I was, i’d simply ask “Why are you letting your agent rip you off?” and offer them my phone number.

 

We publish all of our fee’s so nobody is left in the dark and nobody is left wondering about charges.

Click Here to Download our fees for Let Only Services

Click here to Download Our Fees For Property Management

 

 

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Why Isn’t Your Agent Publishing Their Fees?

If you went to tesco’s and had to wait until you reached the checkout before knowing how much something cost, would you shop there? Would you trust tesco? Would you feel good about going back there? No No No?

hidden feesThen why are so many landlords dealing with agents who are not transparent about their fee’s? They tell you a fee, but don’t tell you its exclusive of VAT, or that it doesn’t cover this that and that or that there is an additional fee if you want this, or that once that fee is paid there is also x y and z to pay. NO!

I get a real bee in my bonnet about lettings agents fee’s. You may have read my previous posts on hidden fee’s, price hiking, unfair fee’s and misleading fee’s.

I think my anger around fee’s stems from a basic human quality of honesty and trust. The way I work and the way I run my business is in a very open, upfront and honest way. I can do this because i’m a small independant. I manage less than 1000 properties and the book stops at me. I don’t have shareholders to please and pay, I don’t have a board to answer to and I do what I do because I’m a landlord, a business owner and an employer. I’m not a tycoon, I’m not a millionaire and I don’t wear a suit. But I do run a good agency that looks after my clients and their properties very well.

Having run an agency for the best part of 20 years, I can see how it would, in the short term boost revenue for the agency. But taking a long term view and thinking like a business partner towards my clients, I wouldn’t want to work with someone who was being underhanded and would not place my trust in a business that was not being upfront and honest with me.

It could be because I’m northern, or because I’m working class or because I’m a landlord myself, but I believe anyone acting on behalf of your property should have your best interests in mind, and not the health of their bank balance. I don’t want to be ripped off and I want to be able to trust that my agent is working for me and not for themselves and their shareholders.

When selecting an agent in future Ask The Right Questions. You can’t compare agents on just their management fee’s (truth be told you can’t compare on just cost but that’s another post for another day), One agent may charge 15% the next 16% – whos the better agent? Nobody knows! Who’s offering the best value for money? Again, nobody knows; ask:

What do they charge for drawing up a tenancy agreement? What is their letting fee? What are the costs for an inventory? What do they charge for a gas safety certificate? What do they charge for an EPC certificate? What would they charge you to change a lightbulb? What would be the expected costs over the course of your entire first tenancy?

Don’t be afraid to ask the questions, do your due diligence and stop letting the big agents rip you off.

What Hidden Fee’s Are In Your Agreement?

As an independent agent, I’m very lucky to not be bound by big company practises and habits. I get to forge my own path and I get to sleep well at night knowing that my business runs in an open, upfront and ethical manner.

It’s disappointing that over the years the sneaky practice of charging an additional commission to contractors for passing work their way has become the norm. This is not only penalising all the sole traders and small businesses who rely upon agents for their livelihood, but it is also being wholly dishonest to those who have placed trust in their business, their clients- the landlords!

Property Eye ran an article related to the current news about Foxtons, it states that agents could be adding from 5%-20% on top of their contractors bills and passing these price hikes back to their landlords.

Having run an agency for the best part of 20 years, I can see how it would, in the short term boost revenue for the agency. But taking a long term view and thinking like a business partner towards my clients, I wouldn’t want to work with someone who was being underhanded and would not place my trust in a business that was not being upfront and honest with me.

It could be because I’m northern, or because I’m working class or because I’m a landlord myself, but I believe anyone acting on behalf of your property should have your best interests in mind, and not the health of their bank balance. I don’t want to be ripped off and I want to be able to trust that my agent is working for me and not for themselves and their shareholders.

hidden feesWhen selecting an agent in future Ask The Right Questions. You can’t compare agents on just their management fee’s (truth be told you can’t compare on just cost but that’s another post for another day), One agent may charge 15% the next 16% – whos the better agent? Nobody knows! Who’s offering the best value for money? Again, nobody knows; ask:

What do they charge for drawing up a tenancy agreement? What is their letting fee? What are the costs for an inventory? What do they charge for a gas safety certificate? What do they charge for an EPC certificate? What would they charge you to change a lightbulb? What would be the expected costs over the course of your entire first tenancy?

Don’t be afraid to ask the questions, do your due diligence and stop letting the big agents rip you off.

We publish all of our fee’s so nobody is left in the dark and nobody is left wondering about charges.

Click Here to Download our fees for Let Only Services

Click here to Download Our Fees For Property Management

I’m Mike Brown, the owner and managing director of Brentwood Lettings. I am a landlord, a property developer and generally someone who knows a thing or two about letting properties. I can always make myself available for a chat, feel free to call my office 0161 681 3724

 

June Auctions – 31 Radnor Street Gorton

tips

 

This months Edward Mellor Auction, really does have some hot property this month (sorry for the summer related pun). Radnor Street is a 2 bed terraced house in Gorton.

 

In my eyes the attractive thing about Gorton is the potential yield and the potential for longer term tenants. I’d expect this property to fetch around £50-55k and could easily achieve a rental income of £500pcm (almost 10% yield)

As an agent, I have lots of experience in letting properties in and around Gorton and would be happy to talk with you if you were looking at this property, or other properties around East or North Manchester. Please feel free to drop in to my offices on Moston Lane, Manchester for coffee and a chat, or call me on 0161 681 3724.

Look forward to speaking to you soon!
 
Regards 
 
Mike Brown

June Auctions – 477 Moston Lane, Moston.

tips

 

Edward Mellor Auctions Salford Auctions have this interesting property listed for 4th June. Being just down the road from my office, i’ve had my eye on this for a conversion into 2 x 2bedroom flats.

The market in Moston is currently saturated with tenants looking for 2 bedroom properties, and this would be a perfect investment to pick up a healthy yield.

Over the past couple of years it has been rare to see a decent 2 bed property in Moston sit empty for more than a month, and this property could be a good mid-long term investment in the hands of the right developer. I’ll be excited to watch how the bidding goes on this.

 

If you are looking to invest in Moston or anywhere in East & North Manchester  and would like any assistance, then please drop in to my offices on Moston Lane, Manchester for coffee and a chat, or call me on 0161 681 3724.
Look forward to speaking to you soon!
 
Regards 
 
Mike Brown

June Auction – 5 Connie Street Openshaw.

tips

This property seems to be a little gem, Openshaw is an up and coming area thanks to the recent opening of the metrolink. Greater numbers of tenants are now looking for two bedroom properties in Openshaw thanks to its new 10 minute commute to the city centre.

This is a property I will have my eye on at the Edward Mellor Auction and will be valuing it as worth around £60-65k. I’d be expecting a rental income of at least £500/m which would put me at about a 10% yield.

I have tenants waiting for properties in Openshaw, so I know this will not stay vacant for any amount of time.

 

If you are looking to invest in Openshaw or anywhere in East & North Manchester  and would like any assistance, then please drop in to my offices on Moston Lane, Manchester for coffee and a chat, or call me on 0161 681 3724.
Look forward to speaking to you soon!
 
Regards 
 
Mike Brown

June Auctions – 12 Sledmere Close, Beswick.

tips

 

This property is excellent, im expecting it to fetch upto £80k, but even then a 3 bedroom semi in Beswick is expected to fetch around £575/m which gives a healthy yield of over 8.5%.

Beswick is becoming one of the hottest and most sought after areas in Manchester for investment property. With the developments at Sport City, the direct metrolink access and the proximity to the city centre, what was once a no-go area is quickly becoming -the- place to live and rent.

Rental properties in Beswick do not remain empty for long and this property, next week, is likely to be one that is popular amongst investors. I may even bid on this myself.

If you are looking to invest in Beswick or anywhere in East & North Manchester  and would like any assistance, then please drop in to my offices on Moston Lane, Manchester for coffee and a chat, or call me on 0161 681 3724.
Look forward to speaking to you soon!
 
Regards 
 
Mike Brown
Ben Street Clayton Main image

Ben Street

Brentwood Lettings are pleased to present this newly decorated 2 bedroom terrace to rent in Clayton. Within…

Price: £ 575.00 pcm
Teddington Road New Moston Main image

Teddington Road

**IDEAL FAMILY HOME** Brentwood Lettings are pleased to offer this spacious 3 bedroom semi detached property to…

Price: £ 600.00 pcm
St Georges Drive Moston Main image

St Georges Drive

Brentwood Lettings are pleased to present this delightful family home which is ideally located on a quiet…

Price: £ 700.00 pcm
Honister Road Moston Main image

Honister Road

Brentwood Lettings are pleased to present this spacious 3 bedroom Semi detached property to rent in Moston.…

Price: £ 599.00 pcm
Lowton Avenue Moston Main image

Lowton Avenue

Brentwood Lettings are pleased to present this two bedroom Terraced property which is situated in the Moston…

Price: £ 540.00 pcm
Silton Street Moston Main image

Silton Street

Brentwood Lettings are pleased to offer this 2 bedroom property located in the Moston area. The property…

Price: £ 540.00 pcm
Ruth Avenue New Moston Main image

Ruth Avenue

Brentwood Lettings are pleased to present this immaculately presented 2 bedroom terraced property which is ideally located…

Price: £ 575.00 pcm

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